Category Archives: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: What Do the Midterms Mean for American Democracy?

Physician and former six-term governor of Vermont, Howard Dean, presents a talk, “What Do the Midterms Mean for American Democracy?”

This presentation is jointly sponsored as a community program by the Henry Sheldon Museum and the Hawthorne Club, both long associated with the history of Middlebury and Addison County.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Bees Besieged – A History of Beekeeping

The Henry Sheldon Museum presents, “Bees Besieged – A History of Beekeeping”Beekeeping goes back 10,000 years, but bees have been much in the news recently as a multi-pronged scourge has devastated many of the nation’s 2.5 million colonies. Meanwhile, hobby beekeeping has grown exponentially in the country.

Bill Mares, writer, and a beekeeper for 45 years, will tell of the origins and evolution of beekeeping, sometimes referred to as “farming for intellectuals,” with a particular emphasis on his new book, with Ross Conrad, and others, “The Land of Milk and Honey, a History of Beekeeping in Vermont.” (Green Writers Press).

This event is sponsored by Table 21.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Meet The Collectors, 3rd Program

This is the third program in the “Meet the Collectors” series. Bruce Yelton will share information about the East Middlebury Iron Works, which was built in 1831, and the iron slag he lent to the Sheldon’s exhibit. Sas Carey, whose mission in life is to support and preserve traditional Mongolian nomadic life, will share some of her rich stories and show some of the Mongolian clothing she has collected over the years (detail pictured above). A collector of sticks and stones, Diana Bigelow takes her collection one step further by creating whimsical figures from the natural materials, and the ballet dancer on display is one of many figures she has made over the last few years.  Sarah S. Fox will share her ongoing hunt for Blue Heaven china produced n the 1950s/60s in Ohio. Her collection spans decorative plates and glassware including the 1965 calendar “glamour plate” featured in the exhibit.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Tick Talk – The Ecology of Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases

The Henry Sheldon Museum presents, “The Ecology of Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases,” a talk by David Allen, Associate Professor of biology at Middlebury College. Allen studies the ecological, climate, and landscape factors which determine tick-borne disease risk. This talk will present a brief introduction to tick biology. Allen will also discuss his research trying to understand what drives tick-borne disease risk in Vermont.

This event is sponsored by Table 21.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Meet The Collectors, 2nd Program

This is the second program in the “Meet the Collectors” series. Four collectors who lent objects to the Sheldon’s exhibit Addison County Collects will talk about their collection. Bob Hooker will show several interesting metal objects he has excavated in his yard including the horseshoe pictured, with a little family history thrown in as well – his grandfather and great-grandfather were both blacksmiths on the property where Bob lives. Rod Michaud will discuss his extensive collection of mechanical banks and toys, like the 1886 Uncle Sam mechanical bank included in the Sheldon’s exhibit. Pam Pezzulo will share how she started her collection of antique children’s sewing machines like the Hansel and Gretel machine in the exhibit, and show some examples from her collection. Musician Rick Ceballos collects banjos and has a few proto-banjos from Africa. He will talk about the Ngoni in the Sheldon’s exhibit along with a few other instruments. Lucinda Cockrell will focus her talk on her collection of Lady Head Vases manufactured by NAPCO in Japan and imported by the National Potteries Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Originally made to hold florists’ flower arrangements, these ceramic head vases became popular in the 1950s and 60s.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Meet The Collectors, 1st Program

This is the first program in the “Meet the Collectors” series. Four collectors who lent objects to the Sheldon’s exhibit Addison County Collects will talk about their collection. Bruce Burgess will discuss his extensive collection of 450 pieces of vintage Fiesta Tableware with particular focus on the original six colors made: red, yellow, cobalt blue, green, ivory, and turquoise (a selection is pictured above). Ann LaFiandra, who has a collection of over 25 pieces of German carved wooden folk art, will show several of her Nutcrackers. Nola Kevra will tell the story of her 1944 “Quilt of Hope,” made by her grandmother for her father while he served in the Pacific in WWII. Mary Manley will relate her experience getting to know Alabama folk artist Mose Tolliver and show works from her collection.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Picturing Difference – Photography, Race, and Democracy in the 19th Century

In this talk, Dr. Smiley will discuss American daguerreotype portraiture, its uses as both as a scientific instrument and as a means of picturing loved ones, as well as the photographic portrait as a medium of democratic participation, particularly for African American, Asian, and women subjects. Smiley will explore how nineteenth-century photographic portrait studios shaped conceptions of “self” and “other” and the sometimes-unlikely places where we may uncover these visual histories in museums and archival collections.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: 3D Wood-Carved Maps: Connecting to Place in a New Way

Jacob Freedman of Treeline Terrains will discuss the group’s business designing custom 3D landscapes combining the trio’s unique craftsmanship backgrounds. Jacob designs maps using GIS to identify trails, water bodies, and buildings to highlight. His colleague Nathaniel Klein hand-joins layered wood blocks, identifying sustainably sourced hardwoods and finally Alex Gemme brings digital files to the CNC router and implements a computer-aided process to carve custom designs. All recent Middlebury College graduates, the group will discuss their entrepreneurship journey, their collaborations with Vermont organization and nonprofits, and delve into their process to create “topography you can touch.” They will explore how tactile models can further efforts toward “inclusive mapping,” helping everyone connect to the places they love.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum