Category Archives: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Picturing Difference – Photography, Race, and Democracy in the 19th Century

In this talk, Dr. Smiley will discuss American daguerreotype portraiture, its uses as both as a scientific instrument and as a means of picturing loved ones, as well as the photographic portrait as a medium of democratic participation, particularly for African American, Asian, and women subjects. Smiley will explore how nineteenth-century photographic portrait studios shaped conceptions of “self” and “other” and the sometimes-unlikely places where we may uncover these visual histories in museums and archival collections.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: 3D Wood-Carved Maps: Connecting to Place in a New Way

Jacob Freedman of Treeline Terrains will discuss the group’s business designing custom 3D landscapes combining the trio’s unique craftsmanship backgrounds. Jacob designs maps using GIS to identify trails, water bodies, and buildings to highlight. His colleague Nathaniel Klein hand-joins layered wood blocks, identifying sustainably sourced hardwoods and finally Alex Gemme brings digital files to the CNC router and implements a computer-aided process to carve custom designs. All recent Middlebury College graduates, the group will discuss their entrepreneurship journey, their collaborations with Vermont organization and nonprofits, and delve into their process to create “topography you can touch.” They will explore how tactile models can further efforts toward “inclusive mapping,” helping everyone connect to the places they love.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Making History with Mrs. M—–‘s Cabinet: Imagining a Feminist Period Room

In this lecture Professor Sarah Carter explores the creation and use of the “Mrs. M.—–‘s Cabinet” period room project at the Milwaukee Art Museum, which she collaboratively created during her time with the Chipstone Foundation. This experimental exhibition hacks into the idea of the museum period room to ask, what does a museum do and who is it for, through the collection and space of an imagined nineteenth-century collector. Sarah Anne Carter, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of the Center for Design and Material Culture and an Associate Professor of Design Studies in the School of Human Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She previously served as Curator and Director of Research at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where she collaboratively curated many museum exhibitions and led Chipstone’s Think Tank Program in support of progressive curatorial practice. The “Elephant in the Room” lecture series is presented with support from Vermont Humanities.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Aesthetic Addictions – Psychological Perspectives on Collecting from Rudolph II to Charles Foster Kane

Collections are the foundation of museums, and behind every collection lies the story of a collector. Dr. Graham C. Boettcher, director of the Birmingham Museum of Art, discusses some of history’s greatest collectors—actual and fictional—exploring what motivates these passionate gatherers and separates them from hoarders. Boettcher will also discuss how the ethics of collecting have changed, and touch on some of the new challenges and obligations collectors—both individual and institutional—face today. This program is presented as part of the “Elephant in the Room” lecture series, supported by Vermont Humanities. This talk is presented with additional support from Marble Trail Financial.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Alexander Wolff: “Riddling Out Endpapers”

Cornwall author Alexander Wolff spent a year in Berlin, sifting through family letters and diaries and mining German archives, for his book Endpapers. In this presentation he describes the process of researching and ultimately writing this saga about his book publisher grandfather, who fled the Nazis, and his father, who was left behind to fight for them. His remarks should be of interest to anyone eager to illuminate their ancestors’ lives and times with primary source materials. Wolff spent 36 years on staff at Sports Illustrated. He is author, co-author, or editor of nine books, including The Audacity of Hoop: Basketball and the Age of Obama; the New York Times bestseller Raw Recruits; and Big Game, Small World: A Basketball Adventure, which was named a New York Times Notable Book. He has a B.A. in History from Princeton, where he has taught journalism.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: David Bain – “Joseph Battell: A Life and a Legacy”

Middlebury College Senior Lecturer in English and American Literatures David Bain will offer a biographical talk on Joseph Battell (1839 –1915), a leading citizen of Middlebury and his estate, which bequeathed his mountain lands to Middlebury College. Battell was a contemporary of Henry Luther Sheldon (1821 – 1907). This talk is offered in conjunction with the exhibit “Sightlines: Picturing the Battell Wilderness.”

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum

Sheldon Museum: Bill McKibben – “Breadloaf as a Vital Center”

Middlebury College Scholar in Residence in Environmental Studies Bill McKibben resides in the Green Mountains and will discuss his wilderness experiences, the environmental and recreational importance of the mountains, and his admiration for the artistic outdoor explorations of Caleb Kenna and Jill Madden.

Bill McKibben is the author of “The End of Nature” (1989), the first book for a general audience about global warming. Recent books include “Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet” (2010), “Deep Economy” (2006), “Enough” (2004), which critiques human genetic engineering and other rapidly advancing technologies; “Wandering Home” (2005), which catalogs his foot-travels across the Vermont landscape; and “Age of Missing Information” (2006), in which he compares his experience watching 1700 hours of videotaped TV to that of contemplating nature in the Adirondacks. In 2007, with six Middlebury College students, McKibben set up Step It Up 2007, which organized more than 1400 climate change demonstrations across the United States. He now leads a similar campaign on a global basis with the group 350.org, and in 2011 he led the fight to stop the Keystone Pipeline project.

 For more info, visit http://henrysheldonmuseum.org/

Producer: Henry Sheldon Museum